OUR GREEK HERITAGE

philip6
Philip3
Philip4
philip5
Philip of Macedonia
Philip2

Greek History
Greece is a much harder place to live than Egypt, because the soil is not as good and there is not always enough water to grow plants for food. So people did not move there until a lot later. Our first evidence of real settlement in Greece comes from about 55,000 BC (57,000 years ago). Even then there were not very many people until around 3000 BC. Greek history is usually divided into a Stone Age, a Bronze Age, and an Iron Age. Sometimes people divide each of these periods into smaller periods as well. Stone Age people all worshiped the Great Goddess and knew that she had created the earth and all of its people. The pottery from the earliest periods, before the gods and goddesses of Greek Myths were introduced, all reflect the Greek’s worship of the Great Goddess.

Greek Old Stone Age
A good deal of the Old Stone Age, or Paleolithic, time period had gone by before anyone came to live in Greece. The first definite signs of people living in Greece are from around 55,000 BC. We still know very little about them. They lived mainly from gathering wild plants and got their meat by hunting wild animals. They did not farm. They probably knew how to plant seeds, but chose not to because there was already plenty of food growing wild for the few people who lived in Greece at this time.
Franchthi Cave Greek Middle Stone Age
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We don't know much yet about the people of Greece in the Middle Stone Age. They still lived mainly from gathering and hunting. They still did not farm or use metal or build houses. They lived in caves.
They seem to have sailed on the Mediterranean Sea in small boats made of reeds and animal skins. We think this because they used tools made of obsidian, and you can't get obsidian on the Greek mainland. The nearest place where there is obsidian is on the Aegean islands between Greece and Turkey, so either the mainland Greeks were sailing to the islands to get obsidian, or the islanders were sailing to Greece to sell it to them.

These people used stone, wood, plant fibers, and bone to make their tools, but they did not use metal. They did not build houses, but lived mainly in caves along the coastline. One example of a cave where people lived in the Old Stone Age is Franchthi Cave. The people living in Franchthi Cave hunted deer and rabbits, caught fish, and gathered wild grain for bread or porridge, wild peas and beans, and nuts.
Neolithic Greece
 
By around 7000 BC there started to be more people in Greece. This may be related to the Black Sea catastrophe which happened about this time. Maybe because of refugees from this disaster, it became harder and harder to get all the food you needed just by gathering and hunting. So people began to farm. Farming was more work (and not as much fun as picking wild berries and nuts), and the food you got wasn't as good for you and was pretty boring, but you could feed more people on less land. People also began to herd sheep and goats.
Once you are farming, you also need to build fences to keep out the deer and rabbits, and to keep in the sheep and goats, and people also began to build houses. Probably there weren't enough caves for all the new people, though people were still living in Franchthi Cave at this time too, and still sailing around in little boats.
By 5800 BC, there was a small village at a place called Nea Nikomedia. The people had small houses made of sticks and mud (wattle and daub). There was a wooden fence around the village to keep out animals (or to keep them in). People had started to use pottery (clay pots). Probably they learned how to make pots from people from West Asia, who came to live in Greece about this time.
 
Sesklo pottery
By around 5000 BC people began having stone foundations for their houses, and stone walls around their villages. Their fanciest pottery (dishes, pitchers, cups) was decorated with red and white patterns, and some of it was carried to other villages and sold there. The best dishes and cups came from a village called Sesklo.
Other villages imitated the Sesklo cups, but not as well. Probably around this time the Greek villages got big enough to choose a "big man" or "headman" to organize the village and settle arguments, and lead the men to war.
Around 4000 BC somebody destroyed the village of Sesklo. Possibly some group of people invaded Greece from the north, from Yugoslavia or Turkey, and took over some parts of Greece. These invading people seem to have had a big military advantage over the Sesklo people: they had bows and arrows, so they could shoot over the stone walls from far away.
 
These new people then settled down and built villages in Greece. One of these new villages is called Dimini. Dimini had one big house in the center, maybe for the headman of the village, and also had several stone walls around it. (These people also moved back into Nea Nikomedia.)
Greek Early Bronze Age
 
Beaked jug from Lerna
Bronze is a metal that is a mixture of a little tin and a lot of copper. It was invented in West Asia, where copper was smelted as early as 6000 BC, and during the 3000's BC experiments showed that adding tin to the copper made it harder: that is bronze. Bronze came to Greece slowly around 3000 BC and did not make much difference right away. Those same Dimini people from the Neolithic continued living in Greece, but they slowly started to use a little bronze. Bronze knives and swords were much easier to make and sharper than stone, bone or wood ones. At the same time, they started to use lead, silver, and gold as well.
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But bronze was very expensive, too. Copper wasn't so hard to get, but traders had to bring tin on donkeys from far away in central Europe (modern Austria). So only the richer or stronger people could afford bronze tools or weapons. Soon a real class system started to develop, where the richer people nearly always married each other and not the poorer people, and it was always these richer people who were in charge.
One way archaeologists can tell that there is a class of rich people whose children inherit their wealth is by finding graves with children buried in them who have gold jewelry and bronze tools and weapons with them. Can you see why this shows us that there was a rich class?
Lerna is an example of an Early Bronze Age village that has been excavated. Like Dimini, Lerna had a big house in the center, at the top of the hill, which may have been the house of the chief. This house is called the House of the Tiles, because it had clay tiles for the roof. Lerna also had many baskets which had been sealed with a special mark pressed into a lump of clay (project idea). This shows that people cared about protecting their property so it would not be stolen.
Lerna also had big stone walls, built with defensive tricks to make it hard for invaders to break in. But around 2100 BC, just as the people of Lerna were in the middle of rebuilding these walls to make them even stronger, some new people invaded Greece and burned down the whole town. Many other towns all over Greece and much of Europe were also destroyed around this time.
Middle Bronze Age Greece
 
These new invaders, who destroyed Lerna at the end of the Early Bronze Age in 2100 BC, were the Greeks (though there is still some debate about exactly when they arrived and from where). Unlike the people of Sesklo, Dimini and Lerna, these new people were Indo-Europeans who spoke an early form of the Greek language. THIS WAS WHEN THE GREEKS WENT FROM A PEACE LOVING PEOPLE WORSHIPING THE GREAT GODDESS TO A WARING PEOPLE. Their special military weapon, which helped them to beat the Early Bronze Age people of Greece, seems to have been the horse, men fighting from chariots drawn by horses, or maybe just using horses to get from one place to another very quickly. Archaeologists digging at Lerna did not find any horse bones until after this invasion.
The Greeks also brought with them a new invention from Western Asia: the pottery wheel. The wheel made it possible to make clay pots much more quickly, and therefore more cheaply, than before.

For about 500 years after the Greeks invaded, not much seems to have happened in Greece. The Greeks learned the new culture and gradually mixed with the people who were already there. The Middle Bronze Age in Greece has been called "500 years without an idea." This is not quite right, though. The Greeks were getting ready for their first appearances in the Mediterranean political scene.
Late Bronze Age Greece
 
By around 1600 BC, the Greeks had gotten completely mixed with the earlier Lerna people, and began to move on to bigger things. First, they started to get to know the other people living around the Mediterranean Sea, especially the Phoenicians (foy-NEE-shans), the Cretans, and the Egyptians. They seem to have started to take jobs as soldiers for the Egyptians, who paid them in gold.
 
Mask of Agamemnon
And they started to buy things from the Phoenicians (or Canaanites) with their gold. Greek graves from this time excavated at Mycenae (my-SEEN-ay) have a lot of gold cups and jewelry and beautiful swords in them, which are now in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece. The Greeks of this time are sometimes called the Myceneans (my-sin-AY-ans) after this site.
 
Lion Gate at Mycenae
As they got to know these other people, the Greeks began to copy their ways of doing things. The Greeks started to have kings instead of village headmen.
These kings had palaces to live in and collected taxes which they stored in big storerooms. The palaces had big stone walls around them. The stones were so big that later Greeks thought the walls must have been built by giants, whom they called Cyclops.
Some Greeks learned to write, in a sort of hieroglyphics called Linear B, so that they could keep records of what taxes had been collected. The kings made their people build paved roads.
In addition to maybe working as soldiers for other countries, the Greeks seem to have sailed around the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea picking fights with people on their own, and taking their gold, and probably also taking the people they met as slaves.
One of these raids, around 1250 BC, may have been to attack the city of Troy, in northern Turkey. Stories about the Trojan War (the war with Troy) were passed down for hundreds of years by singers until they were written down by the poet Homer around 700 BC.
Homer says that when the Greek soldiers came back from the Trojan War they found that Greece was in very bad shape, with a lot of robbers and crime. There may be some truth in this, because archaeology shows that around 1200 BC most of the Greek palaces were destroyed, including the one at Mycenae.
We don't know why this happened, but many people think that there was a general economic depression in the other countries of the Eastern Mediterranean and West Asia around this time, especially in Egypt and in the Hittite kingdom. A lot of people seem to have fallen on hard times. Maybe the Greeks found themselves out of work.
Dark Age Greece
 
After most of the Mycenean palaces were destroyed around 1200 BC, they were not rebuilt. The only palace we know of which was not destroyed was the one at Athens. But even Athens seems to have had a hard time for the next several hundred years. There were no more kings. Taxes were not collected. The roads were not repaired, and gradually became full of holes and could only be used for walking or riding donkeys, not for wagons. Maybe a lot of people died, because there don't seem to have been very many people living in Greece at this time. And the people who were still there were poor, and had no gold jewelry in their graves. It even seems that there were no more potters or shoemakers or other craftsmen, and people mostly had to make their own pots and other things (so the things are very badly made). Without gold, people also stopped sailing to other countries to buy things.
Because Greece was in such bad shape during the Dark Ages, and could not defend herself, it also seems that some of their neighbors to the north invaded Greece and began living in some of the Greek cities. The Greeks called these invaders the Dorians (DOOR-ee-anns), and called the old Mycenean, Bronze Age Greeks the Ionians (i-OWN-ee-anns).
A lot of the Ionians fled from the invaders, or just from the bad times in Greece, and moved to other places during the Dark Ages. Many of them moved to the coast of Turkey, and people began to call that place Ionia because of all the Ionians living there. Others moved to the coast of the Black Sea. Some historians think that some Greeks, or people like them, may have moved to Israel, where they were called the Philistines.
But some good things also happened during this time. Knowledge of how to make tools and weapons out of iron spread from the Hittites around the Mediterranean Sea, and so the Greeks also learned how to work iron. Iron is harder than bronze and cheaper to get, because you can mine it in Greece itself instead of bringing tin from far away. Because iron was cheaper than bronze, more people could use it, even poor people. And without the kings and the palaces, people were generally more equal. The rich people weren't as rich, so the differences between people weren't so big.
Archaic period
 
Archaic statue of Kleobis and Biton
By around 1000 BC the Greeks were starting to rebuild their civilization after the Dark Ages. There seem to have been more people around, and enough gold to pay for building new buildings. The Greeks did not rebuild the kings' palaces, though, because most Greek cities did not have kings anymore. Most cities were ruled by a group of rich men called aristocrats. This kind of government is called an oligarchy (OLL-ih-gark-ee). Instead, the Greeks built temples to the gods where the old palaces had been, mostly on top of hills.
There got to be so many people in Greece that the Greeks began to sent out groups of men (and sometimes women) to build new cities in other parts of Europe and Africa. One example is the city of Marseilles in the south of France. Another is a city on the Black Sea called Byzantion, which is now Istanbul, or the city of Cyrene in Libya. These are called colonies.
The Greeks (especially Corinth) also began to trade with West Asia again, especially with the Phoenicians. They learned the alphabet from the Phoenicians around 750 BC, and that is how Homer was able to write down the stories about the Trojan War. The Greeks also learned about art from Western Asia. The Greeks also began to take jobs as mercenaries (soldiers working for other people) again, in Egypt and also in Lydia (Turkey).
Around 650 BC there were two new ways of doing things which seem to have started in Greece instead of being learned from other people. We are not sure which came first, or whether one caused the other. One was a new way of fighting wars. The old way was rather disorganized: all the men on one side would just run at the men on the other side, yelling their heads off, and then they would fight until one side ran away or were all killed. In the new way, men lined up side by side, and each man used his shield to protect the man next to him, so that there was a wall of shields. Of course this only worked if everybody cooperated, and you had to practice a lot to be able to do it right, like a marching band. Also, everybody had to have a shield. But if you did it right it was much more successful than the old run-and-yell method. These new soldiers were called hoplites (HOP-lights).
The other new idea was for a new kind of government. Some of the Greek cities still had kings (Sparta for instance), but most of them were ruled by groups of aristocrats. These aristocrats were often fighting with each other over who would have the most power. Some of them tried to get other aristocrats on their side. But now one of these aristocrats had the idea to try to get the poor people on his side, too. That was pretty easy to do, because nobody had been paying any attention to these poor people at all. So this aristocrat was able to get more power than his friends and he was in charge of the city. Instead of being called the king, he was called the tyrant. The earliest tyrants (that we know of ) were in Corinth. Soon other aristocrats in other Greek cities (and in West Asia) copied this idea. (For more on tyrants click here). By 550 BC many cities were still ruled by aristocrats, especially the ones where Dorians lived, but many others were ruled by tyrants, especially the ones where Ionians lived, like Athens. Other aristocrats hated the tyrants, but a lot of poor people loved them. Most of the tyrants did a good job. They protected the poor people from the rich aristocrats, they built a lot of new buildings, and they helped people to trade with West Asia and the other nearby places.
Classical Greece
In 510 BC a man named Cleisthenes (KLICE-then-eez), who was an aristocrat in Athens, invented another new type of government, the democracy. Cleisthenes, like other aristocrats, wanted to get more power. But tyrants had gotten unpopular in Athens. Cleisthenes decided to give even more power to poor people. He organized a new way of making political decisions. Every Athenian man would have one vote, and they would all meet and vote on what to do. The big meeting was called the Assembly.
But all the men couldn't meet every day; they had to work. So there was also a smaller council of 500 men, who were chosen by a lottery, and changed every year. Seems like Cleisthenes AND the other aristocrats would be out of power? But he arranged the voting so that his family, the Alcmaeonids (alk-MEE-oh-nids), would have more votes than anyone else.
In 490 BC the Persians attacked Athens. Everybody was very frightened, because the Persians were great fighters. Some people thought Athens should go back to the old system of government, the oligarchy, in case democracy didn't work well enough. They thought it would take too long to make decisions in a democracy. But they didn't go back.
All the men in Athens marched out to meet the Persians at Marathon. They thought they would lose. But the Athenians fought in the new way, with the wall of shields, and the Persians were still running and yelling. So the Athenians won!
In 480 BC the Persians, with their king Xerxes (ZERK-sees) attacked again. This time most of the cities in Greece banded together and formed a league to fight the Persians. They lost their first battle, at Thermopylae (therm-AH-pill-aye), but they won after that, at Salamis and again at Plataea (plah-TAY-ah). Again the Persians went home defeated. (More on the Persian Wars).
The Athenians convinced the other Greek cities that they needed to keep the strong Greek navy together in case the Persians came back again. At first everyone thought this was a good idea, except the Spartans, who refused. Then the Athenians said to the other cities, "Don't bother sending ships and men for the navy anymore; that is too hard. Just send money to Athens, and we will build ships and defend you against the Persians." So a lot of cities did that. But the Persians did not come back. After a while, some of the cities said, "We don't want to send any more money to Athens. We don't think the Persians are going to come back anymore." But the Athenians used their big navy to MAKE the other cities keep sending money. When Miletus (my-LEE-tuss) refused, the Athenians took their city and wrecked it.
The Athenians also spent some of the money on their own city. No Athenians had to pay taxes anymore. They used the money from the other cities to build great temples like the Parthenon.
The other cities in Greece were angry. They asked the Spartans to help stop the Athenians. Some cities took sides with Athens, others with Sparta. There was a big war, from 431 BC to 404 BC (almost thirty years!). This is called the Peloponnesian War. But finally, with the help of the Persians, the Spartans won and the Athenians lost. (more on the Peloponnesian War). By this time, all of Greece had pretty much been wrecked, and the Classical period was over.
SPARTA - In 441 BC, the Spartans decided that the Athenians were pushing everybody around too much, and they got an alliance of other city-states together (mainly Corinth) and attacked Athens to break up Athenian power. This is known as the Peloponnesian War, because Sparta is in the part of Greece called the Peloponnesus.
At first the Spartans were losing the war, but then when there was a plague in Athens they began to win. They won even more after they got advice from an Athenian called Alcibiades. He told them to build a navy. In the end, the Spartans won the Peloponnesian War. In 404 BC, they took over Athens and destroyed the fortification walls around Athens.
But the Spartans didn't get to enjoy their victory for very long. In 369 BC, the Theban army came down into the Peloponnese and helped the Messenians (the helots) get free of the Spartans and form their own city-state. After this, the Spartan men had to work on farms to feed themselves and their children, and they couldn't train all the time. So they weren't the best army anymore, and Sparta became just another small town, without much power.
By 338 BC, Sparta had been taken over by Philip of Macedon, - FROM WHOM OUR TERRELL LINE IS DESCENDED - like all the rest of Greece. It never really got to be independent again, but was part of Alexander the Great's empire, then part of the Roman Empire, then the Byzantine Empire, and finally, in 1453 AD, the Ottoman Empire.

  PHILIP OF MACEDONIA
  M. OLYMPIAS & PHILINNA
  _________________|_________________
  | |
LAGOS (THE RABBIT) ALEXANDER THE GREAT
M. CONCUBINE? M. ROXANNA & STATIRA
  |
PTOLEMY SOTER 1
M. BERENICE
  |
PTOLEMY PHILADELPHUS 2
M. ARSINOE
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
PTOLEMY EUERGETES 3
M. BERENICE
  |
PTOLEMY PHILOPATER 4
M. ARSINOE 3
  |
PTOLEMY EPIPHANES 5
M. CLEOPATRA 1

  |
PTOLEMY PHYSICON 7
M. CLEOPATRA 2
M. CLEOPATRA 3
  |
PTOLEMY LATHYRUS 8
M. CLEOPATRA 4
  |
PTOLEMY AULETES 11
M. EUPATRA, DAUGHTER OF MITHERIDATES
  _________________|_________________
  | |
ARSINOE CLEOPATRA 7 (THE CLEOPATRA)
M. MENNEUS M. JULIUS CAESAR
  | N. MARK ANTONY
PTOLEMY BAR MENNEUS
M. CONCUBINE?
M. ALEXANDRIA REGENT
  |
MARIAMNE 1
M. KING HEROD (THE GREAT)
  |
ARISTOBULUS
M. BERENICE
  |
MARIAMNE (ARRIA THE ELDER)
M. T. FLAVIUS SABINUS 2
  |
MARIAMNE (CAECINA ARRIA THE YOUNGER)
M. SILLIUS DOMITIUS
M. GAIUS CALPERNIUS PISO
M. LUCIUS CALPERNIUS PISO
CONTINUED

MARIAMNE (CAECINA ARRIA THE YOUNGER)
M. GAIUS CALPERNIUS (CAESONINUS) PISO
  |
ARRIUS (ANTONINUS) CALPERNIUS PISO (JOSEPHUS)
M. BOIONIA PROCILLA SERVILIA
  |
POMPEIA PLOTINA DOMITIA LUCILLA 1
M. CORELIUS RUFUS
M. TRAJAN (THE EMPEROR)
  |
DOMITIA LUCILLA 2
M. JULIANUS CALPERNIUS PISO
  |
MARCUS AURELIUS (THE EMPEROR)
M. FAUSTINA 2
  |
CRISPUS COMMODUS
M. BRUTTIA CRISPINA
  |
CLAUDIA CRISPINA
M. EUTROPIUS
  |
CLOVIS CONSTANTIUS 1 (CLORUS)
M. THEODORA
M. ST. HELENA
  _________________|_________________
  | |
EMPORER CONSTANTINE 1 (THE GREAT) CONSTANTINA
M. LICINIUS
  |
LICINIANUS
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
VALENTINIAN 1
M. JUSTINA
  |
VALENTINA JUSTINA
M. THEODOSIUS MAGNUS 1
  |
'ARCHADIUS' CLAUDIUS CLAUDIANUS
M. EUDOXIA
M. SIEGSE
  |
MEROVECH MEROVEE (THE YOUNG)
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
CHIDERICH CLAUDIOS 1
M. ANDOVERA
  |
CLOVIS 1
M. EVOCHILDE
M. CLOTHILDE

CLOVIS 1 (d. 511 C.E.)
M. EVOCHILDE
M. CLOTHILDA
  |
CHLOTHAR 1
M. RADEGUNDA
  |
CHILPERIC 1
M. GALSWITHA
M. FREDEGONDE
  |
CHLOTHAR 2
M. ( 3 WIVES )
  |
DAGOBERT 1
M. ( 5 WIVES )
  |
SIGISBERT 3
M. IMMACHILDE
  |
DAGOBERT 2
M. MATHILDE
M. GISELLE DE RAZES
  |
SIGISBERT 4
M. MAGDALA
  |
SIGISBERT 5
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
BERA 3
M. OLBA
  |
GUILLAUME
M. ( 2 WIVES )
  |
BERA 4
M. ROMILLE
  |
ARGILA
M. REVERGE
  |
BERA 5
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
HILDERIC 1
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
SIGISBERT 6 ('PRINCE URSUS')
M. ROTILDE

SIGISBERT 6 ('PRINCE URSUS')
M. ROTILDE
  |
GUILLAUME 2
M. IDOINE
  |
GUILLAUME 3
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
ARNAUD
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
BERA 6
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
SIGISBERT 7
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
HUGUES 1
M. ANNA
  |
JEAN (JOHN) 1
M. ISABEL
  |
HUGUES
M. AGNES
  |
EUSTACHE 1
M. MAHAUDE DE LOUVAIN
  |
EUSTACHE 2
M. IDE DE ARDENNES
  |
BALDWIN 2
M. CONCUBINE?
  |
MELISENDE
M. FULK 5 OF ANJOU
  |
GEOFFREY PLANTAGENET (THE FAIR) OF ANJOU
M. MATILDA
  |
HENRY 2 (KING OF ENGLAND)
M. ALIX DE PORHOET
M. ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE
  |
JOHN (c. 1199-1216) *
M. ISABELLA OF ANGOULEME

JOHN ( KING OF ENGLAND, c. 1199-1216 ) *
M. ISABELLA OF ANGOULEME
  |
HENRY 3 OF ENGLAND
M. ELEANOR OF PROVENCE
  |
EDWARD 1 (KING)M. ELEANOR OF CASTILE
M. MARGARET OF FRANCE
  |
Descendants of Joan of Acre
1 Joan of Acre 1272 - 1307
... +Ralph de Monthermere
2 Mary de Monthermere
2 Thomas de Monthermere
2 Joan de Monthermere
2 Edward de Monthermere
*2nd Husband of Joan of Acre:
... +Gilbert De Clare 1243 -
2 Eleanor de Clare 1292 - 1337
...+Hugh le Despencer - "The Younger - 1326
3 Isabel Despencer
+Richard Fitzalan-10th Earl of Arundel 1313 - 1375
. 4 [1] Phillippa Fitzalan 1349 -
....... +[2] Richard Serjeaux
.. 5 [3] Elizabeth Serjeaux
........ +[4] William Marney
... 6 [5] John Marney
......... +[6] Alice Throckmorton
.... 7 [7] Anna Marney 1410 -
.......... +[8] Thomas Tyrrell
..... 8 [9] Thomas Tyrrell II (Sir) 1430 - 1490
...........+[10] Elizabeth Le Brun 1430 - 1473
....... 9 [11] William Tyrrell (Sir) 1465 -
............. +[12] Elizabeth Bodley
........ 10 [13] Humphry Tyrrell 1490 - 1547/48
.............. +[14] Jane Ingleton 1498 -
......... 11 [15] George Tyrrell 1530 - 1571
............... +[16] Eleanor Elizabeth Montague 1530 -...............12 [17] William Tyrrell 1552 - 1595
................ +[18] Margaret Richmond 1555 -..............13 [19] Robert Tyrrell 1600 - 1643
................. +[20] Jane Baldwin 1590 - 1661
............ 14 [21] Richmond Terrell 1624 - 1677
.................. +[22] Elizabeth Waters
............. 15 [23] Timothy Tyrrell 1665 -
................... +[24] Elizabeth Foster 1665 -
............... 16 [25] Joseph Terrell 1699 - 1775
..................... +[26] Mary
........17 [27] Joseph Terrell, Jr. 1744/45 - 1787
..................+[28] Elizabeth Mills 1744/45 - 1833
................. 18 [29] David Terrell 1782 - 1819
.................+[30] Mary Henley Thompson - 1871
.. 19 [31] Joseph Carr Terrell 1807 - 1864
......................+[32] Ann Terrell 1790 -
....20 [33] Charles Thomas Terrell 1852 - 1923
........+[34] Frances Pierce McGeHee 1852 - 1929
.....21 [35] Early Thomas Terrell 1882 - 1967
........+[36] Ophelia Louise Harris 1884 - 1968
......22[37] James Emmett Terrell 1911 - 1967
........+[38] Nannie Belle Clendenin 1910 - 1972
......23 [39] Nancy Terrell 1940 -
........+[40] M.F. "Bud" Longnecker (Dr.) 1936 -
.......24[41] Michael Emmett Longnecker 1964 -
.........+[42] Tina Wendy Hilty 1961 -
........25{43] Taylor Hilty Longnecker 1989 -
........24[44] Gregory Stuart Longnecker 1966 -
..........+[45] Helen Hernandez 1965 -
........25[46] Lauren Longnecker 1988 -
.......2nd Wife of [44] Gregory Stuart Longnecker:
...........+[47] Stacy Marie Weinkel 1977 -
.........25 [48] Christian Terrell Longnecker 1997
  25 [49] Hannah Marie Longnecker 1998 -
......3rd wife of {44} Gregory Stuart Longnecker
............+[50] Mamie
...............[51] Luke Longnecker 2005
...............[52] Liana Elizabeth Longnecker 2007

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