Danish, William the Conqueror & rOLLO, THE DANISH VIKING (RIGHT)

FOR A GREAT SITE ON THE VIKINGS GO TO - http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/vikings/

 The Paternal Ancestry of Nancy Clendenin Terrell

Sveide the Viking to Rollo the Dane, Duke of Normandy to William the Conqueror, King of England

 

1. Sveide the Viking, a Norse King, A.D. 760.

 

2. Halfdan the Old, died in 800.

 

3. Ivar, Earl of the Uplands, married the daughter

of Eystein Glumra.

 

4. Eystein, Earl of More, married Aseda of Jutland.

 

5. Rognvald, Earl of More (Count of Maerc, etc.), died 890, married Hilda (Hildir or Hildur)., daughter of Rolf Nefio. They had two sons as follows:

 

 

1. Thoric, Count of Maerc, according to Crispin and Macary.

 

2. Rollo the Dane. See below.

 

According to Crispin and Macary, Rognvald also had a natural son, Hrollager, living in 896, who married Emina _______. They had a son, Hrolf Thurstan, living in 920, who married Gerlotte, daughter of Thibaut, Count of Blois and of Chartres. They were ancestors (five generations) of Hugh of Avranches, 1st Earl of Chester, who died in 1101, and who married Ermentrude, daughter of Hugh, Count of Clermont. See Table III. in Crispin and Macary.

 

 

6. Rollo the Dane, also known as Hrolf or Rollon, 1st Duke of Normandy from 911 to 927, called also Rolf the Walker, because, being so tall, he preferred to go afoot rather than ride the little Norwegian horses. Also shown as Rollon, Row, or Robert Originally a Norse Viking, he was noted for strength and martial prowess. In the reign of Charles II, the Bald, he sailed up the Seine River and took Rouen, which he kept as a base of operations. He gained a number of victories over the Franks, and extorted the cession of the province since called Normandy. By the famous treaty which Charles the Bald and Rollo signed the latter agreed to adopt Christianity. He was born in 846 and died in 932, and was buried in the Cathedral at Rouen. He married (1) Gisla, daughter of Charles the Simple, King of France, no issue; (2) Lady Poppa de Valois, (means puppet or little doll), daughter of Pepin de Senlis de Valois, Count Berenger (Berenarius) of Bretagne, Count of Bayeux, and sister of Bernard of St. Liz (Senlis), also recorded as Berenger, Count of Bayeux. Rollo lived with her for some time before the marriage. There were two children as follows:

 

 

1. William Longsword. See below.

 

2. Gerlotta, married William, Duke of Aquitaine, and Count of Poitou. See elsewhere under the Dukes of Aquitaine.

 

 

7. William Longsword, 2nd Duke of Normandy from 927 to 943`, was also Duke of Aquitaine and died in 942, slain by Arnulf of Flanders with whom he had in good faith gone to confer. He married (1) Leudegarde, daughter of Herbert II, Count of Vermandois, no issue; (2) Espriota (Sporta), daughter of Hubert, Count of Senlis (St. Liz) and cousin of William Longsword.

 

8. Richard I., the Fearless, 3rd Duke of Normandy (943-996), was born about 933, and died in 996, having reigned fifty-five years. He married (1) Emma, daughter of Hugh Magnus, the Great, Count of Paris, no issue; (2) Lady Gonnor de Crepon (Gummora) of Denmark, who died in 1031. Duchess Gonnor had the following brothers and sisters: Herfast de Crepon; Sainfria, married the forester of Scheceville; Wevie, married Osberne Giffard, Sire de Bolbec; Aveline, married Thurold de Pontaudemer. Richard and Lady Gonnor had at least two sons as follows:

 

 

1. Robert, Count of Evereux, and Archbishop of Rouen (989-1037), the ancestor of Simon de Montfort. He was the father of Richard, Count of Evereux, who died in 1067, and married Godehildis, widow of Roger I. of Tosny. See the continuation of this lineage elsewhere in Volume I.

 

2. Richard II See below.

 

3. Mauger, Count of Corbeil.

 

4. Emma of Normandy, married (1) Ethelred II, King of England; and (2) Canute the Great (Cnut), King of Denmark and England. Emma and Ethelred had Edward the Confessor, and Edmund. See the continuation of this lineage elsewhere in Volume I.

 

5. Hedwig, married Geoffrey, Count of Brittany.

 

6. Matilda, married Odo, Count of Charles.

 

7. Geoffrey, father of Gislebert Crispin, grandfather of Richard FitzGilbert, ancestor of the Clare Line, Earls of Hertford and Pembroke.

 

8. William, Count of Eu, died about 1054, married Lesceline.

 

9. Hawise, married Geoffrey, "Duke" of Brittany, died 1008. Their son, Alan III., "Count" of Brittany is reported as a guardian of the young Duke William of Normandy. Alan III. died 1040, married Bertha, daughter of Odo, Count of Chartres.

 

The natural children of Richard I. (see Table V. in Crispin and Macary), a conflict with the above information, were as follows:

 

 

 

1. Godfrey, Count of Brionne and Eu, born circa 1060, died circa 1108. He was the father of Gilbert of Brionne, who died about 1040, guardian of the young Duke William. Gilbert was the father of Baldwin of Meules, and of Exeter, sheriff of Devon; landowner in England, 1086; died 1090. He was also the father of Richard `FitzGilbert' of Tonbridge and Clare; fought at Hastings, 1066; landowner in England, 1086; died 1090, married Rohese, daughter of Walter Giffard. The latter was the head of the house of Clare, Earls of Hertford and Pembroke. See the continuation of this lineage in the Clare in Volume II.

 

2. Daughter (unknown) possibly married Baldric the Teuton, aunt of c. Gilbert.

 

3. William, Count of Exmes (later Eu), died about 1054, married Lesceline, daughter of Turquetil de Neufmarche. They had a son, Robert, Count of Eu; fought at Hastings 1066; landowner in England 1086, died 1090. He was the head of a line of Counts of Eu.

 

4. William, Count. Witnessed foundation of Fecamp, 990.

 

5. Robert, Count. Despoiler of Abbey of Mont St. Michel.

 

6. Daughter, one of the two unidentified daughters was Beatrice, Abbess of Montivilliers, married Gauthier de Lescelina or de Turqueville.

 

 

9. Richard II., the Good, 4th Duke of Normandy from 996 to 1026, died in 1026. He married circa 1008 (1) Judith of Brittany, daughter of Conan le Tort I., Count of Bretagne (Count of Rennes) and his wife, Ermangarde of Anjou. Conan was slain in 992. Judith was also half-sister of Geoffrey, Count of Brittany. Judith died in 1017 or 1018. He married (2) Papia of Envermeu. The children from the first marriage were as follows:

 

 

1. Richard III, Duke of Normandy from 1026 to 1028. He had two natural children: Nicholas, Abbot of St. Ouen, and Helen.

 

2. Robert I the Magnificent. See below.

 

3. Eleanor, married Baldwin IV., Count of Flanders. There was no issue from this marriage. Baldwin IV married (2) Ogiva, and they had a son, Baldwin V, Count of Flanders, father of Matilda, who married William the Conqueror. See the continuation of this lineage elsewhere in Volume I.

 

4. Alisa (Alice) (Adeliza) (Judith), married Rainald I. (Renald), Count of Burgundy, parents of William I., Count of Burgundy, who in turn was the father of Guy de Burgundy, archbishop of Vienne, a pretender to Normandy in 1047, and later Pope Calixtus II., and his brother Rainald II., Count of Burgundy. (Note: This is the only Pope identified in this genealogy.)

 

5. William, monk of Fecamp, died in 1025.

 

6. Mauger, Archbishop of Rouen (1037-1054).

 

7. William, Count of Arques, dispossessed 1053.

 

From the second marriage of Richard the Good and Papia there was a daughter as follows:

 

 

 

1. Papia of Normandy, married Gilbert de St. Valerie. They had two sons as follows:

 

 

1. Richard de St. Valerie, who married Ada, daughter of Herlouin de Hugleville. They had a daughter Ada Hugleville, married to Geoffrey, son of Thurytel. They in turn had a son, Bernard de Newmarsh, who married Nesta, daughter of Nesta of North Wales. They had a daughter, Sibil Newmarsh, who married in 1121 Milo of Gloucester, Earl of Hereford. Their daughter Margery of Gloucester, married Humphrey de Bohun III See the continuation of this lineage in Vol II. in the Bohun Line.

 

2. ???

 

 

 

10. Robert I. the Magnificent, also known as Robert the Devil, 6th Duke of Normandy from 1028 to 1035, died in 1035, a combination of good and evil. By Herleve (Arlotta) (Arlette), daughter of a tanner, Fulbert de Falaise and his wife, Doda, Duke Robert had a son and daughter as follows:

 

 

1. William of Normandy, Duke of Normandy, and William the Conqueror, later King William I. of England. See below.

 

2. Adelaide (Adele) of Normandy, married (1) Enguerrand, Count of Ponthieu; (2) Lambert of Lens, died in 1054, his second marriage; and (3) Odo, Count of Champagne. See the continuation of this lineage elsewhere in Volume I.

 

This was not a marriage; but later Herleve married Herluin (Herlouin), vicomte of Conteville, and had four more children by him (Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, 1049-1090. and Earl of Kent; Robert, Count of Mortain and the Earl of Cornwall; Emma, married Richard, Viscount of Avranches; and Muriel, married Eudo al Chapel, sire de la Haie).

 

 

11. William the Conqueror, 7th Duke of Normandy and King William I. of England, was born at Falaise in 1027. He married in 1053, Matilda (Maud), daughter of Baldwin V., 7th Count of Flanders, a descendant of Emperor Charlemagne, and his wife, Adela, sister of King Henry I. of France. They had ten children as follows:

 

 

1. Robert II. Curthose (Courteheuse), Duke of Normandy (1087-1106), born in 1054, died in 1134. He married Sibella de Conversana. They had a son, William Clito, Duke of Normandy, who died in 1128.

 

2. Richard, born 1057-8, died young.

 

3. William Rufus (William II.), favorite son of William I., succeeded his father as King William II. of England from 1087 to 1100, born 1060; killed by an arrow shot from an unknown hand. He died without issue.

 

4. Henry I., Beauclerc. See below.

 

5. Cecilia, Abbess of Holy Trinity, Caen, born 1056.

 

6. Constance, married Alan (Alain), Count of Brittany, born 1061, married 1086.

 

7. Adelaide, died young.

 

8. Adela, died 1137, married Stephen (Estienne), Count of Blois and Chartres, born 1062, married 1080. They were the parents of Theobald, Count of Blois, and his brother, Stephen, King of England, reigning from 1135 to 1154, father of Eustace, who died in 1153. See the continuation of this lineage elsewhere in Volume I. in the Line of Early German Kings.

 

9. Agatha, born 1064, died without marrying before 1080, alleged to have been betrothed to Harold Godwinson and to Alphonso of Leon.

 

10. Matilda. No more details.

 

William the Conqueror also had three natural children as follows:

 

 

 

1. William Pevrel, by Maud, daughter of Ingleric, an Anglo-Saxon noble. Pevrel married Adelina de Lancaster, daughter of Roger de Poitou, Earl of Lancaster.

 

2. Wife of Hugh de Chateau-sur-Loir.

 

3. Thomas, Archbishop of York.

 

There is some question about one more daughter, Gundred (Gundreda). Some historians feel that she was not the daughter of William, though others feel the opposite. Gundred, married William de Warren, created Earl of Surrey, in England. Some sources think she might have been the daughter of Gerbod, the first husband of Matilda. See elsewhere for continuation of this lineage under the Warren Line (Wurts).

 

 

 

12. Henry I., Beauclerc, King of England, 1100-1135, 8th Duke of Normandy 1106-1135, born 1068.

Edith - Margaret (Matilda) of Scotland, born in 1080 and died in 1118, married Henry I. Beauclerc, King of England, son of William I The Conqueror (ruler from 1066 to 1087) and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, who died in 1083. See this lineage in the Early French Ancestors in Volume I. Matilda was educated at Wilton and Romsey Abbey where she said that her aunt, Christina, forced her to wear a black veil. She threw it on the ground whenever left alone, in spite of beatings. When her mother died she came to England to Edgar Atheling, her uncle. She was a sister of King David of Scotland; she was a correspondent of Anselm and Hildebert, Bishop of Le Mans, who wrote poetry about her. She was a symbol of the union of Saxon and Norman. She was Henry's Queen for seventeen years and six months, and died in her prime like most of her family. Henry and Matilda had a son and a daughter as follows:

 

 

1. William, Duke of Normandy, died in a shipwreck in 1119.

 

2. Matilda (Maud the Empress). See below.

 

In addition to these legitimate births, Henry is reported to have had nineteen or twenty illegitimate children, the highest number of spurious offspring for a King of England to have acknowledged. The best known of them all is Robert the Consul, Earl of Gloucester, father of Maud, wife of Ranulph de Meschines, 2nd Earl of Chester. Another was Reginald, a natural son from a relationship between Henry I. of England and his mistress, Elizabeth Beaumont, daughter of Robert de Beaumont, Count of Meulent and Earl of Leicester, (son of Roger de Beaumont and his wife, Adelina, Countess of Meulent) and his wife Elizabeth Vermandois, younger daughter of Hugh Magnus, the Great, of France, Count of Vermandois. Reginald, married Beatrix, daughter of William Fitz Richard, a potent lord in Cornwall. They had a daughter, Matilda, who married Robert, Count of Meulent, son of Waleran II., Count of Meulent, who married Agnes de Montfort. Waleran II. was a son of the aforementioned Robert Beaumont, and his wife, Elizabeth Vermandois. Robert and Matilda had two children: Waleran III. and Mabel de Beaumont, who married William de Vernon, Earl of Devon, who had three children: Baldwin, Mary Vernon and Joan. Their descendants are not identified.

 

 

Henry I. also married (2) Adeliza of Lorraine, daughter of Geoffrey Barbatus, Duke of Lorraine and Count of Barbant. Adeliza of Lorraine, upon the death of Henry I., married (2) William de Albini. See the continuation of that lineage under the Albini Line in Volume II.

 

 

12. Matilda (Maud the Empress) of England (1102-1167), was left the sole legitimate child of Henry I. by the loss of his son in the White Ship (1120). She married (1) Emperor Henry V, Emperor of Rome, and was crowned at Mainz (1114), but was widowed in 1125 and married (2) Geoffrey IV. le Bel, Plantaganet, 10th Count of Anjou and Maine, Duke of Normandy, having won the Duchy from Stephen, son of Fulk V. the Younger, 9th Count of Anjou, King of Jerusalem, and his wife, Ermengarde. See their ancestral lineage elsewhere in Vol. I. Her first husband was thirty years older, her second husband, ten years younger than herself. Henry made the barons recognize the Empress as his heir (1126, 1131, and 1133), but when he died Stephen ignored her claim to rule England by hereditary right. The Normans preferred his chivalrous geniality to her haughtiness and they disliked the House of Anjou as much as they did the House of Blois, into which Stephen's mother, the Conqueror's daughter Adela, had married. The Empress appealed to the Pope in vain (1136) and Archbishop Thurstan of York defeated her uncle and champion, David I., King of Scotland (1084-1153) at the Battle of the Standard (1138); but at last she landed in England. Geoffrey was the original Plantaganet, so named by his companions for the broom corn he wore on his person. Matilda and Geoffrey had two sons as follows:

 

 

1. Henry II. See below.

 

2. Geoffrey, died in 1158.

 

It is through Geoffrey that the Plantaganet line from France was brought into the British royalty (see the lineage of the Counts of Anjou elsewhere). He died in 1151. After Geoffrey's death Matilda lived in Normandy, charitable and respected. Matilda died in 1167. Geoffrey was succeeded by his eldest son, Henry.

 

 

13. Henry II. Plantaganet, first Plantaganet King of England (1154-1189), known as Curt Mantel, was born at Le Mans, France, on March 15, 1133. At eighteen in 1151 he was invested with the Duchy of Normandy, his mother's heritage, and within a year became also, by his father's death, Count of Anjou; while in 1152 he married Eleanor of Aquitaine, the daughter of William X, Duke of Aquitaine (see his ancestral lineage elsewhere in Vol. I.), and divorced wife of King Louis VII. of France, added Poitou and Guienne to his dominions. In January 1153 he landed in England, and in November a treaty was agreed to whereby Henry was declared successor to King Stephen; he was crowned in 1154 and ruled until his death in 1189. He confirmed the laws of his grandfather, King Henry I, reestablished the exchequer, banished the foreign mercenaries, demolished the hundreds of castles erected in Stephen's reign, and recovered the royal estates. The whole of 1156 he spent in France, reducing his brother, Geoffrey of Nantes, who died in 1158, and having secured his territories, he spent the next five years warring and organizing his possessions on the Continent. Henry's objective was that of all Norman kings, to build up the royal power at the expense of the barons and the church. From the barons his reforms met with little serious opposition; with the clergy he was less successful. To aid him in reducing the church to subjection, he appointed his chancellor, Thomas a Becket to the see of Canterbury. Henry compelled him and the other prelates to agree to the 'Constitution of Clarendon', but Bechet proved a sturdy churchman, and the struggle between him and the monarch terminated only by his murder. In 1174 Henry did penance at Bechet's tomb, but he ended by bringing the church to subordination in civil matters. Meanwhile he organized an expedition to Ireland. The English Pope, Adrian IV, had in 1155 given Henry authority over the entire island of Ireland; and a number of Norman-Welsh knights had gained a footing in the country, among them Richard de Clare, Earl of Pembroke, styled Strongbow, who in 1155 married the heiress of Leinster and assumed rule as the Earl of Leinster. Henry was jealous at the rise of a powerful feudal baronage in Ireland, and during his stay there (1171-1172) he broke the power of Richard Strongbow and the other nobles. Henry and Eleanor had many children as follows:

 

 

1. William Plantaganet, the eldest son, was born in 1153, but died in childhood in 1156.

 

2. Henry Plantaganet, Associate King of England, born February 28, 1155, known as Henry "the Young King," was crowned as his father's successor in 1170. Henry married Margaret, daughter of Louis VII., King of France. In 1173, incited by their jealous mother, Queen Eleanor, this prince and his brother Richard rebelled against their father, and their cause was espoused by the King of France and the King of Scotland. The latter, King William the Lion, was ravaging the north of England when he was taken prisoner at Alnwick in 1174, and to obtain his liberty he submitted to do homage to Henry II. In a few months King Henry II. had reestablished his authority in all his domains. During a second rebellion, Prince Henry died June 11, 1183. He married Margaret, daughter of Louis VII., King of France.

 

3. Matilda Plantaganet, born in 1156, died in 1189, married Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony and Duke of Bavaria. They had a son, Otto IV. of Brunswick, Emperor (1208-1215).

 

4. Richard Plantaganet, the Lion-Hearted, born in 1157, married Berengaria of Navarre, daughter of Sancho VI. of Navarre. Richard d.s.p. April 6, 1199. He reigned as King Richard I. of England and Duke of Normandy, 1189-1199. Richard was imprisoned by the Emperor Henry VI in 1192, while returning from a Crusade. His freedom was obtained by ransom in 1194. After his release he was in constant battle with Philip Augustus, King of France. Berengaria died in 1230.

 

5. Geoffrey Plantaganet, Duke of Brittany, 1171-1186, died in 1158, married Constance of Brittany, daughter of Conan IV. of Brittany. She died in 1201. In 1186, he was killed in a tournament. He and his wife had two children:

 

 

1. Eleanor, who died in 1240.

 

2. Arthur, Duke of Brittany, born in 1187 and murdered in 1204, while in conflict with his uncle, King John I. King John saw him as a rival to the throne.

 

 

6. Eleanor (Eleanora) Plantaganet of Castile, born in 1162, died in 1214, promised initially by her father to marry French royalty, but eventually married Afonso VIII. of Castile., King of Castile (1158-1214). He was the son of Sancho III., the Desired, King of Castile (1157-1158). See this lineage in the Kings of Spain Line in Volume I. Eleanor and Afonso VIII. had the following children (Note: Some differences are seen between this list and the one in the Kings of Spain Line):

 

 

1. Sancho of Castile.

 

2. Bergenuela (Berengaria) of Castile, married Afonso IX, King of Leon. They had a son, Ferdinand III, who married Joanna Dammartin. See the continuation of this lineage in the Spanish Kings Line of Volume I.

 

3. Uracca of Castile, had been promised to Louis VIII., the heir of France, but eventually married Afonso II. the Fat, King of Portugal, 1211-1223. She was rejected by the French because of her unusual name. Her younger sister, Blanche was deemed to be more suitable for the French tastes.

 

4. Blanche of Castile, born on March 4, 1188, in the palace of Placentia, in Castile, where she spent most of her childhood years, married on May 23, 1200, Louis VIII. of France., prince and heir of France and eventually King of France. Blanche received as her dowry, the town of Evreux with its surrounding land, always a bone of contention between France and England, but nevertheless given to her by her father-in-law, King Philip. Her uncle, King John of England, gave her the fiefs of Issoudun and Grapay in Berry. See the continuation of this lineage elsewhere in Volume I. See Pernoud, "Blanche of Castile," for details on her life and times. Their son was King Louis IX of France.

 

5. Constancia of Castile

 

6. Matilda of Castile

 

7. Sancha of Castile

 

8. Enrique of Castile

 

 

7. Joanna Plantaganet, born in 1165, married (1) William II of Sicily, who died in 1189; and (2) Raymond VI. (Raimund) of Toulouse, who died in 1222. She died in 1199. From the second marriage they had Raymond VII. of Toulouse, who was father of Joan of Toulouse.

 

8. John Plantaganet, Lackland, born December 24, 1166, the youngest legitimate son of King Henry II. In 1185 Prince John was appointed King of Ireland, but before the end of 1186 he was driven from the Ireland and all was left in confusion. See details below.

 

Henry also had a natural son by Rosamund Clifford (?), William Longsword (Longespee), who became Earl of Salisbury by marrying the Countess Ela, then aged twelve (1198). He was a councilor of John and commanded the English part of the army which Philip Augustus of France defeated at Bouvines (1214). He supported King John at Runnymede (1215), fought for Henry III. at Lincoln and Sandwich (1217), and served with Hubert de Burgh as "ruler of the King and kingdom" (1222). He died in March, 1226.

 

 

In 1188, while Henry II. was engaged in a war with Philip of France, Richard joined the French King; and in 1189, Henry having lost Le Mans and the chief castles of Maine, agreed to a treaty of peace granting an indemnity to the followers of Richard. The sight of his favorite son John in the list broke his heart; and he died at Chinon, on July 6, 1189. On the whole, Henry was an able and enlightened sovereign, a clear-headed, unprincipled politician, and an able general; his reign was one of great legal reforms. At its height, Henry's power had been greater than that of any other European ruler and his position was comparable to that of such Holy Roman Emperors as Charlemagne and Frederick Barbarossa. Eleanor died in 1202. Henry was succeeded by his surviving son, John.

 

 

 

14. John Plantaganet, Lackland, King of England (1199-1216), the fifth and favorite son of King Henry II and Queen Eleanor, was born at Oxford on December 24, 1166, and he died at Newark Castle, Notts, October 19, 1216, and was buried at Worcester Cathedral. He was named Lackland by his father because he was the youngest son, meaning he had little land inheritance. He married on August 29, 1189 (1) Isabella (Hawisa), Countess of Gloucester, daughter of William, Earl of Gloucester, by whom he had no children. She was previously married to Hugh of Lusignan. John divorced her in 1199 after ten years of marriage and married (2) Isabella of Angouleme, daughter of Aymer (Adhemer) de Taillefer, Count of Angoulesme, the swordsmith, who died in 1246, who may possibly have descended from Taillefer, who was supposed to be the court jester of Duke William of Normandy, sister and heir of Amyer Taillefer, Earl of Angoulesme. Henry of Huntington in his Chronicle states that Taillefer, who was supposed to be the jester of Duke William, before the armies closed for the fight at the Battle of Hastings,

 

"sportively brandishing swords in front of the English troops, while they were lost in amazement at his gambols, slew one of their standard-bearers. A second time one of the enemy fell. The third time he was slain himself."

 

 

On the other hand Wace says that Taillefer called to Duke William,

 

 

"A boon, sire. I have long served you and you owe me for all such service. Today, so please you, you shall repay it. I ask as my guerdon and beseech you for it earnestly that you will allow me to strike the first blow in the battle."

 

 

To which the Duke replied, "I grant it." Then Taillefer put his horse to a gallop, charging before all the rest.

 

 

Isabella was the mother of all his legal children, she was only 12-years of age when she was married. She married (2) Hugh X. of Lusignan, by whom she had the following children: Henry, Count of La Manche; William of Valence, died in 1269, father of Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke (1307-1324); Guy of Valence: Geoffrey of Lusignan; Aymer, Bishop of Winchester, died in 1280; and Alice le Brun, who married John de Warenne. Isabella died in 1246.

 

 

King John, who reigned as King of England from 1199 to 1216, traveled extensively in England, as few of his predecessors had done, often dealing with mundane financial and legal matters. He reluctantly signed the Magna Charta, permitting basic rights to the barons and landowners, a landmark document in the history of western civilization. [Editor's Note: Of interest from a genealogical standpoint is the fact that the majority of barons opposed to King John all became common ancestors as the royal family and the baronial families intermarried in the following several generations. The specific baronial families who had signers of the Magna Carta are detailed in Volume II. of this genealogical record.]

 

 

According to the Plantaganet Chronicles,

 

 

"John was a great prince but scarcely a happy one, experiencing the ups and downs of Fortune. He was munificent and liberal to outsiders but a plunderer of his own people, trusting strangers rather than his subjects, wherefore he was eventually deserted by his own men and, in the end, little mourned."

 

 

He and his second wife, Isabella, had the following children:

 

 

 

1. Henry III. Plantaganet, his successor. See below.

 

2. Richard of Cornwall Plantaganet, Earl of Cornwall, King of Romans and Almiane (Germany), 1256. He was born January 5, 1209, youngest son of King John. He was made Earl of Cornwall and Count of Poictou, 1225. He refused the Empire in 1250. He married (1) Isabel Marshal, daughter of William Marshal, Earl of Pembroke, and widow of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester. He died in 1272. They had a son, Henry:

 

 

1. Henry of Almiane, who was slain at Viterbo in 1271, and who was alluded to by Dante (Inferno, xii, 115).

 

He married (2) Sanchia, 3rd daughter and co-heir of Raymond Berenger V., Count of Provence and his wife, Beatrix of Savoy. Sanchia was the sister of Queen of England, Eleanor of Provence, wife of Henry III., the sister of the Queen of France, Margaret of Provence, wife of Louis IX., and the sister of Beatrice, wife of Charles of Anjou, who was the brother of Louis IX. Richard and Sanchia had the following children:

 

 

 

1. Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, married Margaret, daughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, and d.s.p. in 1300.

 

2. Richard de Cornwall, King of the Romans, who was slain at the siege of Berwick in 1296.

 

 

3. Joan Plantaganet, married Alexander II., King of Scotland. She died in 1238.

 

4. Isabel (Isabella) Plantaganet, married Frederick II., Emperor and King of Germany (1215-1250), son of Henry IV., Emperor (1190-1197), grandson of Frederick I., Barbarossa. See his lineage elsewhere in Volume I. She died in 1241. They had three sons as follows:

 

 

1. Henry, died in 1245.

 

2. Conrad, who ruled Germany from 1250 to 1254. He had a son, Conradin, who ruled Germany from 1254 to 1268.

 

3. Manfred.

 

 

5. Eleanor (Alianore) Plantaganet, married (1) William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, who died in 1231, without issue. He was the son of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and his wife, Isabel Clare. Eleanor married (2) Simon II de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, who died in 1265. She died in 1275. From the second marriage, Eleanor and Simon had the following children (See Volume II for details):

 

 

1. Henry de Montfort, died in 1265, slain at Evesham.

 

2. Simon de Montfort, died in 1271.

 

3. Guy de Montfort, died in 1287-88.

 

4. Almaric de Montfort.

 

5. Eleanor Montfort, who married Llewellyn ap Gruffydd, Prince of North Wales, who died December 10, 1282. They had two daughters: Catherine, who married Philip ap Ivor, Lord of Cardigan; and Gwenllian, a nun.

 

John Plantaganet, Lackland, died at Berkhampstead in 1279. He also had natural children as follows:

 

 

 

1. Isabella Plantaganet, married Maurice de Berkeley, Lord Berkeley, of Berkeley Castle.

 

2. Richard of Cornwall had the manor of Thunnock, in Lincolnshire, from Edmund, Earl of Cornwall, in 1280. He married Joan St. Owen, daughter of John St. Owen, Lord St. Owen. There was issue.

 

3. Walter of Cornwall, to whom Edmund, Earl of Cornwall gave lands on his manor of Branell, in the 18th year of Edward I.

 

There are reports that John had a total of seven or eight illegitimate children during his lifetime; other names that have been reported are as follows:

 

 

 

1. Geoffrey FitzRoy, died 1205.

 

2. Joan of England, died in 1237, married in 1206, Llewelyn the Great, Prince of North Wales. See the continuation of this lineage in the Welsh Kings Line of Volume I.

 

3. Richard, fl. 1217.

 

4. Oliver, fl. 1218.

 

5. Osbert

 

 

15. Henry III. Plantaganet, King of England (1216-1272), was born on October 1, 1207, at Winchester, and died on November 16, 1272, at St. Edmundsbury, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. He reigned from 1216 to 1272. He was only nine years old when his father died, and he was crowned king of England, on October 28, 1216. William Marshal was persuaded by King John's executors to become rector of the king and kingdom. The king's mother, Isabel of Angouleme, left England and married again (1220), the Marshal died (1219), and Hubert de Burgh ruled undisturbed until 1223. Then Henry, aged sixteen, became fully responsible for the disposal of his seals, castle, lands, and wardships. He was also Earl of Winchester. In 1227 he declared himself of age; in 1232 he deprived Hubert de Burgh, who ruled as regent and justiciary, of all his offices; and in 1234 he took administration into his own hands. On January 14, 1236, he married Eleanor of Provence, daughter of Raymond Berengar (Berenger) IV., Count of Provence, 1222-1291, and his wife, Beatrix of Savoy. Eleanor was also the sister-in-law of St. Louis, King of France, and niece of Amadeus IV., Count of Savoy. Henry III. reigned in the period from 1216 to 1272. He was memorable because he showed himself unfitted to exercise supreme power (1234-1258). By acting as if the Magna Charta had never been, he provoked the opposition of the barons and made possible the rise of Simon de Montfort. Dante represents him in Purgatory among those punished for being negligent rulers. Unsuccessful in war, whether in Wales (1228) or Gascony (1242-43), he was equally unsuccessful at home, and the defeat of Simon de Montfort's baronial rebellion was due not to Henry but to his son, Edward I. After his death Queen Eleanor became a nun at Ambresbury in Wiltshire and died there on June 24, 1291. They had the following children:

 

 

1. John Plantaganet, died young.

 

2. Henry Plantaganet, died young.

 

3. Edward I., Plantaganet, became king of England. See details below.

 

4. Edmund Plantaganet, Crouchback, Earl of Lancaster and Earl of Leicester He died in 1296. See continuation of this lineage in Volume II.

 

5. Margaret Plantaganet, married in 1215, Alexander III., King of Scotland, at the age of ten years. She died in 1275. They had Margaret, who married Eric, King of Norway, and in turn they had Margaret, "Maid of Norway", who died in 1290.

 

6. Beatrice Plantaganet, married John II. de Dreux of Brittany, Duke of Brittany, who died in 1305. She died in 1275. They two sons: Arthur and John of Brittany, the latter died in 1334.

 

7. Katherine Plantaganet, died in 1257.

 

 

16. Edward I., Plantaganet, Longshanks, Earl of Chester, King of England (1272-1307), the third son of Henry III and his wife Eleanor, was born at Westminster on June 17, 1239 and during the reign of his father took active part in political affairs. He was the Earl of Chester. He was taken prisoner at Lewes in 1264 but escaping, he defeated the Earl of Leicester. In 1272 he went on a Crusade as far as Acre, where his daughter Joan was born, and although he inherited the crown that year, he did not return to England until 1274, being crowned on August 19, 1274. It is significant of the times that he was able to thus move in a leisurely fashion across Europe without fear of disturbances at home.

 

He fully accepted those articles of The Great Charter (Magna Charta) of King John which had been set aside at the beginning of his father's reign, and which required that the king should levy scutages and aids only with the consent of the Great Council or Parliament. The further requirement of the barons that they should name the ministers of the crown was allowed to fall into disuse. Edward was a capable ruler, and knew how to appoint better ministers than the barons were likely to choose for him. He was eminent not only as a ruler but as a legislator and succeeded in enacting many wise laws, because he knew that useful legislation is possible only when the legislator has an intelligent perception of the remedies needed to meet existing evils, and is willing to content himself with such remedies as those persons who are to be benefited by them are ready to accept. The first condition was fulfilled by Edward's own skill as a lawyer, and by the skill of the great lawyers whom he employed. The second condition was fulfilled by his determination to authorize no new legislation without the counsel and acquiescence of those who were most affected by it. Not until late in his reign did he call a whole parliament together as Earl Simon de Montfort had done. Instead, he called the barons together in any manner which affected the barons, and the representatives of the townsmen together in any manner which affected the townsmen, and so with other classes. In 1295 he summoned the "Model Parliament," so called because it became the form for future Parliaments.

 

 

Every king of England since the Norman Conquest had exercised authority in a twofold capacity: (1) as head of the nation and (2) as the feudal lord of his vassals. Edward laid more stress than any former king upon his national headship. Early in his reign he divided the Curis Regis into three courts: (1) The Court of King's Bench, to deal with criminal offenses reserved for the king's judgment and with suits in which he was himself concerned; (2) The Court of Exchequer, to deal with all matters touching the king's revenue; and (3) The Court of Common Pleas, to deal with suits between subject and subject. Edward took care that these Courts should administer justice, and dismissed judges and many other officials for corruption. In 1285 he improved the Assize of Arms of King Henry II., to assure national support for his government in time of danger. His favorite motto "Keep Troth" indicates the value he placed upon a man's oath.

 

 

Alexander III. was King of Scotland in the earlier part of Edward's reign, and his ancestors had done homage to Edward's ancestors, but, in 1189, William the Lion had purchased from Richard I possessions which Henry II. had acquired by the treaty of Falaise. The Lion's successors, however, held lands in England, and had done homage for them to the English kings. Edward would gladly have restored the old practice of homage for Scotland itself, but to this Alexander had never consented. Edward coveted the prospect of being lord of the entire island, as it would not only strengthen his position, but would bring the two nations into peaceful union. A prospect of effecting a union by peaceful means offered itself to Edward in 1285, when Alexander III. was killed by a fall from his horse, near Kinghorn. Alexander's only descendant was his grand-daughter Margaret, the child of his daughter and King Eric of Norway. In 1290 it was agreed that she should marry the Prince of Wales but that the two kingdoms should remain absolutely independent of each other. Unfortunately the Maid of Norway, as the child was called, died on her way to Scotland and this plan for establishing friendly relations between the two countries came to naught. If it has succeeded, three centuries of warfare and misery might possibly have been avoided.

 

 

Edward I. married in 1254 (1) Eleanor of Castile, daughter of Ferdinand III, King of Castile and Leon, and his wife Jeanne of Dammartin, who was the daughter of Simon Dammartin and his wife, Marie, Countess of Ponthieu, and on her death in 1279 that country came by descent to Eleanor. Jeanne of Dammartin died on November 20, 1290. Her body was brought for burial from Lincoln to Westminster, and the bereaved husband ordered the erection of a memorial cross at each place where the body rested. The years that followed were filled with wars with France and with difficulties in Scotland. Edward married September 8, 1299 (2) Margaret of France, daughter of Philip III., King of France. King Edward died, during the third invasion of Scotland, at Burgh-on-the-Sands near Carlisle, July 8, 1307, and was buried at Westminster. Margaret, the second wife of King Edward I., died February 14, 1317 and was buried at Grey Friars, London.

 

 

It was King Edward I. who first conferred the title Prince of Wales, thus designating the fourth son, Edward, who was the oldest to survive, and who later became Edward II., King of England. The children of King Edward I. and his first wife, Eleanor of Castile were as follows (Ref: Parsons, "The Year of Eleanor of Castile's Birth and Her Children by Edward I." Medieval Studies, xlvi (1984), pp 249- 265, where Parsons lists 14 children with the probable existence of 2 more unnamed):

 

 

 

1. Katherine Plantaganet, born in 1261-1263,-died 1264.

 

2. Joan Plantaganet, born in January 1265, died in September 1265. See below for another daughter with the same name, who is a direct ancestor.

 

3. John Plantaganet, died young, born in July 1266, died in August 1271.

 

4. Henry Plantaganet, died young, born in May 1268, died in October 1274.

 

5. Eleanor Plantaganet, born in June 1269, died in August 1298, married by proxy in 1282 to Alphonso III., King of Aragon, 1285-1291. She is also recorded as married to Henry III. of Bar.

 

6. Unnamed daughter, born about 1271, died about 1271-1272.

 

7. Joan (Joanna) Plantaganet of Acre, born in 1272, in Acre in the Holy Land during a crusade, died in April 1307. She was looked after in Ponthieu, by her maternal grandmother, Jeanne of Dammartin, much of her childhood. She married in 1290, (1) Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, who died in 1295, and later, a clandestine marriage, to (2) Ralph de Monthermer, who died in 1307. See continuation of this lineage elsewhere under the Clare Line. [Note: This lineage also connects with the Beers Family in the late 17th Century when a Joseph Bulkeley (c. 1644-1719) married Martha Beers, daughter of James Beers, of Fairfield, CT.

Descendants of Joan of Acre

 

1   Joan of Acre 1272 - 1307

... +Ralph de Monthermere

2   Mary de Monthermere

2   Thomas de Monthermere

2   Joan de Monthermere

2   Edward de Monthermere

*2nd Husband of Joan of Acre:

... +Gilbert De Clare 1243 -

2   Eleanor de Clare 1292 - 1337

..... +Hugh le Despencer - "The Younger - 1326

3   Isabel Despencer

...... +Richard Fitzalan-10th Earl of Arundel 1313 - 1375

. 4   [1] Phillippa Fitzalan 1349 -

....... +[2] Richard Serjeaux

.. 5   [3] Elizabeth Serjeaux

........ +[4] William Marney

... 6   [5] John Marney

......... +[6] Alice Throckmorton

.... 7   [7] Anna Marney 1410 -

.......... +[8] Thomas Tyrrell

..... 8   [9] Thomas Tyrrell II (Sir) 1430 - 1490

........... +[10] Elizabeth Le Brun 1430 - 1473

....... 9   [11] William Tyrrell (Sir) 1465 -

............. +[12] Elizabeth Bodley

........ 10   [13] Humphry Tyrrell 1490 - 1547/48

.............. +[14] Jane Ingleton 1498 -

......... 11   [15] George Tyrrell 1530 - 1571

............... +[16] Eleanor Elizabeth Montague 1530 -

.......... 12   [17] William Tyrrell 1552 - 1595

................ +[18] Margaret Richmond 1555 -

........... 13   [19] Robert Tyrrell 1600 - 1643

................. +[20] Jane Baldwin 1590 - 1661

............ 14   [21] Richmond Terrell 1624 - 1677

.................. +[22] Elizabeth Waters

............. 15   [23] Timothy Tyrrell 1665 -

................... +[24] Elizabeth Foster 1665 -

............... 16   [25] Joseph Terrell 1699 - 1775

..................... +[26] Mary

................ 17   [27] Joseph Terrell, Jr. 1744/45 - 1787

...................... +[28] Elizabeth Mills 1744/45 - 1833

................. 18   [29] David Terrell 1782 - 1819

....................... +[30] Mary Henley Thompson - 1871

.................. 19   [31] Joseph Carr Terrell 1807 - 1864

........................ +[32] Ann Terrell 1790 -

................... 20   [33] Charles Thomas Terrell 1852 - 1923

......................... +[34] Frances Pierce McGeHee 1852 - 1929

.................... 21   [35] Early Thomas Terrell 1882 - 1967

.......................... +[36] Ophelia Louise Harris 1884 - 1968

..................... 22   [37] James Emmett Terrell 1911 - 1967

........................... +[38] Nannie Belle Clendenin 1910 - 1972

....................... 23   [39] Nancy Terrell 1940 -

............................. +[40] M.F. "Bud" Longnecker (Dr.) 1936 -

........................ 24   [41] Michael Emmett Longnecker 1964 -

.............................. +[42] Tina Wendy Hilty 1961 -

......................... 25   [43] Taylor Hilty Longnecker 1989 -

........................ 24   [44] Gregory Stuart Longnecker 1966 -

.............................. +[45] Helen Hernandez 1965 -

......................... 25   [46] Lauren Longnecker 1988 -

........................ *2nd Wife of [44] Gregory Stuart Longnecker:

.............................. +[47] Stacy Marie Weinkel 1977 -

......................... 25   [48] Christian Terrell Longnecker 1997 -

......................... 25   [49] Hannah Marie Longnecker 1998 -

....................... 23   [50] James Emmett Terrell, Jr. 1944 -

..................... 22   [51] Earley Thomas Terrell, Jr. 1907 - 1955

........................... +[52] Eugenia Jackson Beazley

....................... 23   [53] Betty Jeanne Terrell 1931 -

............................. +[54] Beverly Monroe Wilkerson

........................ 24   [55] Kenneth Earley Wilkerson 1952 -

.............................. +[56] C. J. Dowling

......................... 25   [57] Megan Lynn Wilkerson

........................ 24   [58] Beverly Anne Wilkerson 1954 -

........................ 24   [59] Sheryl Mae Wilkerson 1958 -

.............................. +[60] Gary W. McNeeley

......................... 25   [61] Thomas Randolph McNeeley 1959 -

........................ 24   [62] Thomas Randolph Wilkerson 1959 -

....................... 23   [63] Anne Jackson Terrell 1934 -

............................. +[64] Richard Everett Kirkpatrick 1931 -

........................ 24   [65] David Lee Kirkpatrick 1954 -

.............................. +[66] Penny Monroe

......................... 25   [67] David Lee Kirkpatrick II

........................ 24   [68] Gayle Renee Kirkpatrick 1956 -

........................ 24   [69] Michael Earley Kirkpatrick 1958 -

........................ 24   [70] Douglas Bryan Kirkpatrick 1959 -

....................... 23   [71] Mary Lou Terrell Terrell 1939 -

............................. +[72] Bobby Turner 1940 -

........................ 24   [73] Terrell Anne Turner 1960 -

........................ 24   [74] Faith Lynn Turner 1963 -

..................... 22   [75] Frances NelsonTerrell 1915 - 1972

........................... +[76] Henry Drewry Kerr 1914 -

....................... 23   [77] Henry Drewry Kerr III 1941 -

............................. +[78] Cheryle Strong 1944 -

........................ 24   [79] Michelle Lynne Kerr 1968 -

........................ 24   [80] Stephen Phillip Kerr 1972 -

....................... 23   [81] Martha Robbins Kerr 1947 -

............................. +[82] Clifford Allen Randolph

..................... 22   [83] Martha Louise Terrell 1920 -

........................... +[84] Nathan Lenoir Riddle 1923 -

....................... 23   [85] Michael Lenoir Riddle 1954 -

............................. +[86] Andrea Jean Berry 1952 -

........................ 24   [87] Mark Andrew Riddle 1977 -

........................ 24   [88] Brian Christopher Riddle 1978 -

....................... 23   [89] Alan Terrell Riddle 1957 -

............................. +[90] Denise Elaine Edgeman

........................ 24   [91] James Tobias Wheeler 1978 -

........................ 24   [92] Terrell Edgeman Riddle 1984 -

....................... *2nd Wife of [89] Alan Terrell Riddle:

............................. +[93] Nancy Jean Jenks

.................... 21   [94] Emmett Hermann Terrell 1878 -

.......................... +[95] Daisy Ellett

..................... 22   [96] Virginia Terrell

..................... 22   [97] Margaret Terrell

.................... 21   [98] Hervey Rosser Terrell 1880 -

.......................... +[99] Lucy Vaughn 1880 -

..................... 22   [100] Robert Terrell

........................... +[101] Millie

....................... 23   [102] Jane Terrell

....................... 23   [103] Susan Terrell

....................... 23   [104] Martha Terrell

.................... 21   [105] Joseph Stuart Terrell 1886 - 1950

.......................... +[106] Roberta Y. Winfrey 1882 - 1965

..................... 22   [107] Joseph Stuart Terrell, Jr. l 1917 - 1980

........................... +[108] Katherine Hunt Galusha 1917 -

....................... 23   [109] Katherine Winfrey Terrell 1948 -

............................. +[110] Charles Brenton (Dr.)

........................ 24   [111] Joseph Daniel Brenton

..................... 22   [112] William Winfrey Layne Terrell 1919 -

........................... +[113] Lillian May Shelton 1922 -

....................... 23   [114] Mary Louise Terrell 1956 -

....................... 23   [115] W. W. L. Terrell 1959 -

....................... 23   [116] Martha Irene Terrell 1964 -

..................... 22   [117] Hervey Rossner Terrell 1920 - 1964

........................... +[118] Lillian D. Sibold 1923 -

....................... 23   [119] HR. Terrell, Jr 1948 -

............................. +[120] Eleanor Hudson

........................ 24   [121] Shaun R. Terrell

........................ 24   [122] Margaret Ann Terrell

....................... 23   [123] Margaret Ann Terrell 1951 -

....................... 23   [124] Jean Stuart Terrell 1957 -

..................... 22   [125] Roberta Frances Terrell 1925 -

........................... +[126] John Parker Jarvis, Jr.

....................... 23   [127] Alice Roberta Jarvis 1948 -

............................. +[128] Leslie F. Howell, Jr. 1946 -

....................... 23   [129] John Stuart Jarvis 1954 -

....................... 23   [130] David Terrell Jarvis 1959 -

*2nd Husband of Isabel Despencer:

...... +Richard Fitzalan

. 4   [1] Phillippa Fitzalan 1349 -

....... +[2] Richard Serjeaux

.. 5   [3] Elizabeth Serjeaux

........ +[4] William Marney

... 6   [5] John Marney

......... +[6] Alice Throckmorton

.... 7   [7] Anna Marney 1410 -

.......... +[8] Thomas Tyrrell

..... 8   [9] Thomas Tyrrell II (Sir) 1430 - 1490

........... +[10] Elizabeth Le Brun 1430 - 1473

....... 9   [11] William Tyrrell (Sir) 1465 -

............. +[12] Elizabeth Bodley

........ 10   [13] Humphry Tyrrell 1490 - 1547/48

.............. +[14] Jane Ingleton 1498 -

......... 11   [15] George Tyrrell 1530 - 1571

............... +[16] Eleanor Elizabeth Montague 1530 -

.......... 12   [17] William Tyrrell 1552 - 1595

................ +[18] Margaret Richmond 1555 -

........... 13   [19] Robert Tyrrell 1600 - 1643

................. +[20] Jane Baldwin 1590 - 1661

............ 14   [21] Richmond Terrell 1624 - 1677

.................. +[22] Elizabeth Waters

............. 15   [23] Timothy Tyrrell 1665 -

................... +[24] Elizabeth Foster 1665 -

............... 16   [25] Joseph Terrell 1699 - 1775

..................... +[26] Mary

..........17   [27] Joseph Terrell, Jr. 1744/45 - 1787

.....................+[28] Elizabeth Mills 1744/45 - 1833

..............18   [29] David Terrell 1782 - 1819

.......................+[30] Mary Henley Thompson - 1871

...............19   [31] Joseph Carr Terrell 1807 - 1864

........................ +[32] Ann Terrell 1790 -

...............20   [33] Charles Thomas Terrell 1852 - 1923

.............+[34] Frances Pierce McGeHee 1852 - 1929

............... 21 [35] Early Thomas Terrell 1882 - 1967

....................+[36] Ophelia Louise Harris 1884 - 1968

...............22   [37] James Emmett Terrell 1911 - 1967

.................+[38] Nannie Belle Clendenin 1910 - 1972

...............23   [39] Nancy Terrell 1940 -

.....................+[40] M.F. "Bud" Longnecker (Dr.) 1936 -

...............24   [41] Michael Emmett Longnecker 1964 -

.....................+[42] Tina Wendy Hilty 1961 -

...............25   [43] Taylor Hilty Longnecker 1989 -

..............24   [44] Gregory Stuart Longnecker 1966 -

....................+[45] Helen Hernandez 1965 -

...............25   [46] Lauren Longnecker 1988 -

..........*2nd Wife of [44] Gregory Stuart Longnecker:

...................+[47] Stacy Marie Weinkel 1977 -

................25  [48] Christian Terrell Longnecker 1997 -

................25  [49] Hannah Marie Longnecker 1998 -

...........23 [50] James Emmett Terrell, Jr. 1944 - 1989

..........*3rd wife of (44) Gregory Stuart Longnecker

4509812630.jpg

Rollo, the Danish Viking, invaded Normandy France in the 10th century.  See # 6 below.  His ancestors became the future Kings of England.  The story of how he carried off Poppa, the daughter of one of the most powerful families in all of Europe is most interesting and I recommend that all of my grandchildren read it.  It can be found at the following websites -

 

http://home.austarnet.com.au/dfgoonan/NORMANDY.htmnd at

"Robert I" was the Viking who established the Norse men in France and thus created "Normandy." It's said he was called Marching Rolf because he was too large to be carried by a horse, and so marched everywhere. His descendants include many of William the Conqueror's companions who were to become major landholders in England. Thus the families here are anchored on both sides of the Channel. Note the number of instances where "children already listed above" is noted, with "above" an active link to that point in the chart; they show how many times this chart "collapses," or doubles upon itself, through the marriage of two who share ancestry.

It is striking how this Scandinavian bloodline ran to so many later kings and counts.

The account Jean Mabire gives of Rolf runs like this: Rolf, son of jarl Ragnwald of Alesund in Norway (whom Harald had sent to hold the Orkney & Shetland islands) led the life of a roaming Viking, raiding the French coast with his band. Problem was that at home he carried on the same way, still pillaging; he was stormy and battle-prone; and got himself banned from Norway.  Seems everyone else who had a problem with authority joined his fleet, spent a winter in England, went on to Zealand and finally wandered on into the Seine.

The people of Rouen negotiated with him to be their protector. There had already been

Norwegian and Danish settlers in the area. King Charles "the Simple" of France made an effort to chase away the Vikings, but Rolf's men triumphed at Pont-de-l'Arche, then went on to raid Melun, where the French again tried to beat them off and lost. So the Vikings ruled the area from their seat at Rouen, and mostly turned to colonization instead of pillaging.

But Rolf looked beyond the Seine valley; he extended his holdings across the Risle, then the Orne, then took Bayeux in 900, killing Count Béreanger who had held it; Rolf kidnapped and married the count's daughter Popa. And, finally, in 911, Charles "the Simple" recognized Rolf's holdings.

4516415778.jpg